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No tsunami threat after Hawaii quake on volcano

CNN

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center says a magnitude-4.4 earthquake near the summit of an erupting volcano on Hawaii's Big Island isn't large enough to create a tsunami.

Posted: May 25, 2018 7:41 PM

HONOLULU (AP) - The Latest on the eruption of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island (all times local):

2:25 p.m.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center says a magnitude-4.4 earthquake near the summit of an erupting volcano on Hawaii's Big Island isn't large enough to create a tsunami.

The agency says the island doesn't face a tsunami threat after the temblor struck around 12:44 p.m. Friday. County officials have warned of aftershocks.

The Kilauea volcano has been erupting for three weeks, spewing lava from cracks that emerged in neighborhoods and sending ash sky-high from its summit. Earthquakes also have been occurring.

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12:55 p.m.

Tourism officials say Hawaii's Big Island has lost about $3 million for May, June and July as major cruise lines have canceled planned stops because of an erupting volcano.

Ross Birch of the island's tourism board says Norwegian Cruise Lines will resume visits to Kona on the west side of the island May 30 but skip Hilo on the east side, roughly 30 miles (48 kilometers) from the Kilauea volcano.

Scientists say explosive eruptions are occurring daily and lava is flowing from several cracks in the ground.

U.S. Geological Survey scientist Wendy Stovall said Friday that the summit is shooting out a plume of water vapor and ash.

The National Weather Service expects trade winds to slow over the weekend, creating hazardous air quality and decreased visibility. Volcanic gases, pollution and ash may increase along with sulfur dioxide levels downwind of lava fissures.

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8 a.m.

Authorities say an eruption at the summit of a volcano on Hawaii's Big Island has sent an ash cloud about 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) into the air.

Those living in communities southwest of the Kilauea volcano are warned that wind might carry ash their way after the eruption Thursday night.

U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Mike Poland says small ash explosions are coming from the summit intermittently as lava keeps flowing into the ocean.

Lava also is spewing from fissures in the Leilani Estates subdivision, which has been evacuated for three weeks. About 2,000 people have fled their homes.

Officials say nearly 50 structures, including dozens of houses, have been destroyed since fissures began opening up in backyards on May 3.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

5/25/2018 7:28:13 PM (GMT -5:00)

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