New global guidelines coming regarding first responders and drones

Drones and other technologies are increasingly used by criminals to facilitate a range of crimes, for example through conducting surveillance, transporting illicit items or remote monitoring. Drones and other technologies are increasingly used by criminals to facilitate a range of crimes, for example through conducting surveillance, transporting illicit items or remote monitoring.

The rules, which will be dubbed the INTERPOL Drone Response and Forensic Guidelines, are being compiled following a two-week long workshop in November.

Posted: Dec 18, 2018 8:27 AM
Updated: Dec 18, 2018 8:32 AM

By early 2019, law enforcement and other first responders will have new guidelines on how to deal with drones being used by criminals.

The rules, which will be dubbed the INTERPOL Drone Response and Forensic Guidelines, are being compiled following a two-week long workshop in November.

The INTERPOL Drone Response and Forensic Guidelines will be available in the following formats:

  • First responder guidelines (basic and advanced)
  • Summary of guidelines for responders to carry in the field
  • Incident Record Forms for non-technical first responders
  • Digital forensic examiners flowcharts and notes templates
  • Core competencies for first responders and technical first responders

The INTERPOL Drone Response and Forensic Guidelines, due to be issued in early 2019, will offer police and other first responders procedures for handling cases where drones are part of the criminal investigation, from tracing the use of the devices to ext

Drone experts from six countries (Bulgaria, Lebanon, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States) did a series of tests on more than 10 different drones “known to be used by criminals to better understand their characteristics and limitations.”

INTERPOL said they walked through the process by which first responders would react when encountering a drone. They also disassembled and diagnosed the drone’s hardware and software, which can oftentimes “hold critical data for law enforcement investigations."

Back in August, former director of counterterrorism at the CIA, Bernard Hudson, penned an op-ed in the Washington Post, in which he points to the growing need to be able to counter drone-based attacks.

In it he cites the failed assassination attempt against Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro as well as claims that an armed drone was used to attack the international airport in Abu Dhabi.

“No one was killed in either case, and the circumstances of both remain murky. But a new and dangerous era in non-state-sponsored terrorism clearly has begun, and no one is adequately prepared to counter it,” Hudson wrote.

INTERPOL held a Drone Expert Forum in late August as part of their Global Complex for Innovation (IGCI) in Singapore. The event, which was supported by the FBI and the Netherlands Police was deemed a “first step towards developing the global capacity to deal with the emerging threat posed by ‘unmanned aerial systems’ known as drones.”

A specific date for the publishing and distribution of the INTERPOL Drone Response and Forensic Guidelines was not stated.

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