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Morgan County program helps people recovering from addiction

Rendell Drummond, who runs the program, says he modeled the program after the one he went to that led to his sobriety.

Posted: Oct 8, 2019 6:15 PM

After two disturbing stories from Limestone and DeKalb counties that police say involved children being put in harm's way by parents who may have been under the influence of drugs, WAAY 31 wanted to learn what resources are available for North Alabama parents struggling with addiction.

We visited one program in Morgan County that is helping men become fathers again.

"When you're a person who's in the grip of addiction, it tells you what to do," Rendell Drummond said.

Drummond runs a men's recovery program in Morgan County called "Living Free Recovery," but before that, he was also a father who struggled with drug addiction.

"I started using drugs when I was a teenager, and so drugs was a part of my life. It was a part of my DNA. Everything I've done was surrounded around using dope," Drummond said.

He said it took one choice to lead him to recovery.

"I chose sobriety over the penitentiary. Well, I sure am grateful that I did," he said.

He credits his sobriety with a program in Birmingham, and says he's modeled his program after that one.

On two campuses in Falkville and Hartselle, he houses about 52 men. During the day, they work, and at night, they do group classes and bible study.

Drummond said it's important that people recovering from addiction learn how to be employees, because it gives them a way to earn money and provide for themselves, and it keeps them busy so they are less likely to relapse.

"Most people that are struggling with addiction, they need detox and then they need to learn how to live, and learn how to live sober, because they have forgotten or they never knew," he said.

He says he wishes he could've been there to help Elizabeth Case and Dustin Smith before police say they put their children in harm's way.

"If I could turn back time, I would put my phone number in their pocket, and I'd tell them to please call, please call somebody," he said.

Drummond says he eventually wants to expand this program to help people in Madison. His program is only for men, but he says a similar program for women is in Cullman County, called "Restoring Women's Outreach."

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