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Ethical hacker shows how to protect private information from thieves

We all know cyber security is a critical issue. Huntsville recently took center stage with the topic at the National Cyber Summit earlier this month at the Von Braun Center. Thought leaders from across the United States gathered to explore ways to create a stable, safe, and resilient cyberspace.

Posted: Jun 29, 2018 8:45 AM
Updated: Jun 29, 2018 8:54 AM

We all know cyber security is a critical issue.  Huntsville recently took center stage with the topic at the National Cyber Summit earlier this month at the Von Braun Center. Thought leaders from across the United States gathered to explore ways to create a stable, safe, and resilient cyberspace.

Huntsville mother of three Oyuki Sampson and her husband Phillip told WAAY 31 they take internet security very seriously; not just for themselves but for their three children as well.

Oyuki says Phillip is meticulous about changing his passwords.

"Also your phone, you change it often. Sometimes I want to get on his phone and I'm like, okay you changed it again," she said.

Joshua Crumbaugh is an ethical hacker. He hacks into computer networks for companies and organizations in order to test or evaluate its security. He was also one of the guest speakers at the National Cyber Summit. WAAY 31 set up a meeting between Oyuki and Phillip Sampson along with ethical hacker, Joshua Crumbaugh to show how easily a hacker can gain access to their information.

"So what I did with this one, was I sent an email that appeared to be from Microsoft and it said, hey, there is a critical security patch that you need to run, click here and when they clicked, it gave them this application," said Crumbaugh.

Once Phillip and Oyuki clicked on the link, Crumbaugh was directly accessing their computer and everything on it, even getting a direct view of their web camera.

"Really anything I could possibly want to do on that computer now, I could from that computer and they wouldn't know because it was happening in the background," said Crumbaugh.

"It's eye opening. You think you're safe but you're really not," said Oyuki.

"The thing I am most surprised with is how easy he accomplished those tasks," said Phillip.

Here is how to protect yourself from internet thieves:
Experts say the number one best thing you can do is to be careful what you click on; if there are any red flags pay attention. Second, make sure you keep all of your devices updated.

"A good practice is, once a month, sit down at your computer and update everything," said Crumbaugh.

Lastly, keep a very strong password.

"The best advice I can give to people is to use a pass phrase. It doesn't have to be super complex. Length is going to make your password more secure than anything else so if you use a password like sallywenttothestore you are getting a much longer and much more secure password," he said.

Another important tip the experts gave us, purchase a web cam cover for your computer that way hackers can't spy you.

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