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Federal civil rights complaint filed against Fayetteville fire chief

Ultimately the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission could step in if there's an appeal of the city's decision.

Posted: Jan. 23, 2018 7:20 PM
Updated: Jan. 23, 2018 7:35 PM

WAAY 31 is continuing to dig into the racially-charged controversy involving the "n" word happening inside Fayetteville's city government.

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Just over 24 hours ago, Travis handed a retirement letter backdated to Jan. 5. That date is one day before Travis's suspension was supposed to start.

The Dec. 15 police report reads Danny Travis was at Tammy's Outback Bar and Grill on Edison Street. Travis told police that's where a black man with a gun walked up. According to the report, the man told Travis to hand over his wallet. Travis said he was pistol whipped. According to the report, Travis suffered injuries.

He was left with blood running down his face. The report indicates Travis fought back, hitting the other man three times. That same night, Travis called 911. Travis told dispatch, he found a cell phone in the parking lot. He said that phone belonged to a "Devonte Pullen" who was at Tammy's Outback during the altercation.

During that 911 call, the report said Travis launched into a profanity-laced tirade about officer Austin McGee.

On Jan. 2, Police Chief Richard Howell told Officer McGee Travis made a racial slur, all caught on tape during a 911 call. Two days later, McGee filed a Title VI complaint.

WAAY 31 requested and paid for the 911 recording for Dec. 16. That's the date, the former fire chief called a black police officer the "n" word.

Now we're told the communications call center will let us know within seven days if they will hand that over. The federal Title VI complaint is a section of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The section reads:

“No person in the United States shall on the grounds of race, color or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”

Ultimately the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission could step in, if there's an appeal of the city's decision.

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